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Asher Ross
Asher Ross

A Remedial English Grammar for Foreign Students: How to Download and Use the Answer Key


A Remedial English Grammar for Foreign Students by F.T. Wood




If you are a foreign student who wants to improve your English grammar skills, you might want to check out this book by Frederick T. Wood. A Remedial English Grammar for Foreign Students is a classic textbook that has been helping learners of English for over 50 years. In this article, we will tell you more about this book, why it is useful for foreign students, what are its main features, how to use it effectively, where to find the answer key for the exercises, and what are some of the topics covered in it.




a remedial english grammar for foreign students by ft wood answer key.zip19



Why is this book useful for foreign students?




English grammar can be tricky for non-native speakers, especially if their native language has a different grammatical system. There are many rules, exceptions, variations and nuances that can cause confusion and errors. A Remedial English Grammar for Foreign Students is designed to help foreign students overcome these difficulties by focusing on the common mistakes and problems they face. The book explains the rules and principles of English grammar in a clear and simple way, with plenty of examples, exercises and answers. It also provides useful tips on how to avoid errors and improve one's accuracy and fluency.


What are the main features of the book?




The book is divided into 42 chapters, each covering a specific aspect or topic of English grammar. Each chapter begins with an introduction that explains the topic and its importance, followed by a series of examples that illustrate the correct usage. Then, there are exercises that test the learner's understanding and application of the rules. The answers to the exercises are given at the end of each chapter, along with some additional notes and explanations. The book also has two appendices: one containing a list of irregular verbs, and the other containing a list of common idioms and phrases. The book is suitable for intermediate to advanced learners of English, and can be used as a self-study guide or as a supplementary material for classroom instruction.


How to use the book effectively?




Here are some tips and suggestions on how to make the best use of this book and improve your grammar skills:


  • Read the introduction of each chapter carefully and try to understand the main points and rules.



  • Study the examples and try to notice the patterns and structures of the sentences.



  • Do the exercises and check your answers with the key. If you make any mistakes, try to find out why and learn from them.



  • Review the notes and explanations at the end of each chapter and make sure you understand them.



  • Practice using the grammar points in your own sentences and speech. Try to apply them in different contexts and situations.



  • Refer to the appendices for additional information on irregular verbs and idioms.



  • Revise the topics regularly and test yourself on them.



Where to find the answer key for the exercises?




If you want to download the answer key for the exercises in this book, you can do so from this link: A remedial English grammar for foreign students : answers to exercises. This is a reliable source that provides the answer key file in a zip format. To unzip it, you will need a software like WinZip or 7-Zip. Once you unzip it, you will find a PDF file that contains the answers to all the exercises in the book. You can use this file to check your answers and correct your mistakes.


What are some of the topics covered in the book?




The book covers a wide range of grammar topics that are essential for foreign students who want to master English. Here are some of the topics covered in each chapter of the book:


The Articles




This chapter explains the use and omission of definite and indefinite articles (the, a, an) in English. It covers the rules for using articles with singular and plural nouns, countable and uncountable nouns, proper nouns, abstract nouns, collective nouns, etc. It also covers the cases where articles are not used, such as with names of languages, countries, continents, etc.


Agreement between Subject and Verb




This chapter explains the rules and exceptions for subject-verb agreement in English. It covers how to make sure that the verb agrees with its subject in number (singular or plural) and person (first, second or third). It also covers some special cases where subject-verb agreement can be tricky, such as with collective nouns, indefinite pronouns, compound subjects, inverted subjects, etc.


Nouns: Singular and Plural




This chapter explains the formation and spelling of singular and plural nouns in English. It covers how to add -s or -es to regular nouns, how to change the vowels or consonants of irregular nouns, how to form plurals of compound nouns, foreign nouns, abbreviations, etc. It also covers some nouns that have the same form for singular and plural, such as sheep, fish, etc.


The Partitive use of 'of'




This chapter explains the use of 'of' to express quantity or part of a whole in English. It covers how to use 'of' with fractions, percentages, measurements, etc. It also covers how to use 'of' with collective nouns, such as a bunch of flowers, a pack of cards, etc.


Concord of Nouns, Pronouns and Possessive Adjectives (Third Person)




This chapter explains the agreement of nouns, pronouns and possessive adjectives in number (singular or plural), gender (masculine or feminine) and person (third person) in English. It covers how to choose the correct pronoun or possessive adjective to refer back to a noun or antecedent. It also covers some cases where concord can be difficult, such as with generic nouns, indefinite pronouns, collective nouns, etc.


The Possessive Adjective or the Definite Article with Nouns Denoting Parts of the Body




Confusion of Adjectives and Adverbs




This chapter explains the difference between adjectives and adverbs in form and function in English. It covers how to form adverbs from adjectives by adding -ly, how to use adjectives and adverbs to modify nouns and verbs respectively, how to avoid confusion between adjectives and adverbs that have the same form, such as fast, hard, etc. It also covers some common errors with adjectives and adverbs, such as using good instead of well, using double negatives, etc.


Fairly and Rather




This chapter explains the meaning and usage of these two adverbs in English. It covers how to use fairly and rather to express degree or intensity of adjectives or adverbs, how to use fairly and rather to express contrast or surprise, how to use fairly and rather with different types of adjectives or adverbs, such as positive, negative, gradable, ungradable, etc. It also covers some cases where fairly and rather have different meanings or implications, such as with good, bad, nice, etc.


Adverbial use of 'No', 'Not' and 'None'




This chapter explains the difference between these three negative words in English. It covers how to use no and not to negate nouns and verbs respectively, how to use none to mean 'not any' or 'not one', how to use none with singular or plural nouns or pronouns, how to use none with of or without of. It also covers some cases where no and not can be interchangeable, such as with any, ever, etc.


Difficulties with Comparatives and Superlatives




This chapter explains the formation and use of comparative and superlative forms of adjectives and adverbs in English. It covers how to add -er or -est to short adjectives or adverbs, how to use more or most with long adjectives or adverbs, how to form irregular comparatives and superlatives, such as good-better-best, bad-worse-worst, etc. It also covers some rules and exceptions for using comparatives and superlatives, such as with than or as...as, with double comparatives or superlatives, with two-syllable words ending in -y or -ly, etc.


Confusion of Participles: Active and Passive Voice




The Prop-word One




This chapter explains the use of the prop-word one in English. It covers how to use one to avoid repetition of a noun or an adjective, how to use one to refer to a person or a thing in general, how to use one to express an opinion or a preference, how to use one with possessive adjectives or pronouns, such as one's, ones, etc. It also covers some cases where one cannot be used, such as with proper nouns, collective nouns, uncountable nouns, etc.


Prepositions




This chapter explains the use of prepositions in English. It covers how to use prepositions to show the relationship between a noun or a pronoun and another word in a sentence, such as place, time, direction, manner, reason, etc. It also covers some common prepositions and their meanings and uses, such as at, in, on, by, for, from, of, etc. It also covers some cases where prepositions can be omitted or added, such as with verbs of movement, verbs of communication, verbs of perception, etc.


The Word home: Used with and Without a Preposition




This chapter explains the use of the word home with and without a preposition in English. It covers how to use home without a preposition when it means 'the place where one lives' or 'the place where one was born or raised', how to use home with a preposition when it means 'a building or an institution where people live or stay', how to use home with different prepositions to express different meanings or nuances, such as at home, in home, on home, etc. It also covers some idiomatic expressions with home, such as home sweet home, make oneself at home, feel at home, etc.


Negative Verbs




This chapter explains the use of negative verbs in English. It covers how to form negative verbs by adding not or n't to the main verb or the auxiliary verb, how to use negative verbs with different tenses and modal verbs. It also covers some cases where negative verbs can be used to express different meanings or emphases, such as with never, hardly, scarcely, etc.


Tenses




This chapter explains the use of tenses in English. It covers how to form and use different tenses to express different times and aspects of an action or a state, such as present simple, present continuous, present perfect, past simple, past continuous, past perfect, future simple, future continuous, future perfect, etc. It also covers some cases where tenses can be used to express different meanings or attitudes, such as with conditional sentences, reported speech, hypothetical situations, Redundant Pronouns and Prepositions in Complex Sentences




This chapter explains how to avoid redundant pronouns and prepositions in complex sentences in English. It covers how to omit pronouns and prepositions when they are not necessary or clear from the context, such as with relative clauses, infinitive clauses, gerund clauses, etc. It also covers some cases where pronouns and prepositions cannot be omitted, such as with passive voice, indirect objects, phrasal verbs, etc.


Redundant Conjunctions in Complex Sentences




This chapter explains how to avoid redundant conjunctions in complex sentences in English. It covers how to omit conjunctions when they are not necessary or clear from the context, such as with coordinate clauses, subordinate clauses, adverbial clauses, etc. It also covers some cases where conjunctions cannot be omitted, such as with contrastive clauses, conditional clauses, concessive clauses, etc.


Introductory There




This chapter explains the use of introductory there in English. It covers how to use there to introduce a subject that comes after the verb, especially with verbs like be, have, exist, etc. It also covers how to use there with different tenses and modal verbs. It also covers some cases where there can be used to emphasize or contrast the subject or the verb.


The Infinitive




This chapter explains the use of the infinitive in English. It covers how to form and use the infinitive with or without to, how to use the infinitive as a noun, an adjective or an adverb, how to use the infinitive with different verbs and expressions, such as modal verbs, verbs of perception, verbs of preference, etc. It also covers some cases where the infinitive can be used to express different meanings or purposes, such as with passive voice, causative verbs, future time, etc.


Anticipatory it with Noun Clauses and Adjective Clauses




This chapter explains the use of anticipatory it with noun clauses and adjective clauses in English. It covers how to use it to anticipate a clause that comes after the verb or the adjective, especially with verbs like be, seem, appear, etc. and adjectives like important, necessary, difficult, etc. It also covers how to use it with different types of clauses, such as that-clauses, wh-clauses, to-infinitive clauses, The Position of Adverbs




This chapter explains the position of adverbs in English. It covers how to place adverbs before or after the verb, the subject, the object or the clause, depending on the type and meaning of the adverb. It also covers some cases where the position of adverbs can change the meaning or emphasis of the sentence, such as with frequency adverbs, manner adverbs, degree adverbs, etc.


Verbs Compounded with Adverbs: The Position of the Object




This chapter explains the position of the object with verbs compounded with adverbs in English. It covers how to place the object before or after the verb and the adverb, depending on the type and form of the object. It also covers some cases where the position of the object can change the meaning or clarity of the sentence, such as with phrasal verbs, separable verbs, inseparable verbs, etc.


Tag Questions




This chapter explains the use of tag questions in English. It covers how to form and use tag questions to confirm or check information, to express interest or surprise, to invite agreement or conversation, etc. It also covers how to use different types of tag questions, such as positive-negative, negative-positive, same-same, etc. It also covers some cases where tag questions can be used to express different tones or attitudes, such as with intonation, modal verbs, indefinite pronouns, etc.


Appended Questions




This chapter explains the use of appended questions in English. It covers how to form and use appended questions to add information or clarification to a statement, to express doubt or uncertainty, to ask for permission or advice, etc. It also covers how to use different types of appended questions, such as yes-no, wh-, alternative, etc.


Indirect (Reported) Questions




This chapter explains the use of indirect (reported) questions in English. It covers how to form and use indirect questions to report what someone asked or wondered, to be polite or formal, to avoid repetition or interruption, etc. It also covers how to use different types of indirect questions, such as yes-no, wh-, if-whether, etc. It also covers some cases where indirect questions can be used to express different meanings or implications, such as with modal verbs, word order, punctuation, The Indirect Expression of Imperatives




This chapter explains the use of the indirect expression of imperatives in English. It covers how to form and use indirect imperatives to express commands, requests, suggestions, advice, etc. in a polite or indirect way. It also covers how to use different types of indirect imperatives, such as with modal verbs, infinitives, subordinate clauses, etc.


The Use of Correlatives




This chapter explains the use of correlatives in English. It covers how to use correlatives to connect two words, phrases or clauses that have a similar or parallel structure or meaning. It also covers some common correlatives and their meanings and uses, such as both-and, either-or, neither-nor, not only-but also, etc. It also covers some cases where correlatives can be used to express different meanings or emphases, such as with inversion, ellipsis, repetition, etc.


Who and Whom




This chapter explains the difference between who and whom in English. It covers how to use who and whom as relative pronouns or interrogative pronouns, depending on the function and case of the pronoun in the sentence. It also covers some cases where who and whom can be interchangeable or optional, such as with prepositions, informal speech, etc.


Much and Many




This chapter explains the difference between much and many in English. It covers how to use much and many to express quantity or degree of countable and uncountable nouns respectively. It also covers some cases where much and many can be used with different meanings or implications, such as with adverbs, comparatives, questions, negatives, etc.


Much and Very




Still and Yet




This chapter explains the difference between still and yet in English. It covers how to use still and yet to express continuation or non-completion of an action or a state in the present or the past. It also covers how to use still and yet with different tenses and modal verbs. It also covers some cases where still and yet can be used to express different meanings or attitudes, such as with contrast, surprise, expectation, etc.


Make and Do




This chapter explains the difference between make and do in English. It covers how to use make and do with different nouns to express different actions or activities. It also covers some common collocations and expressions with make and do, such as make a mistake, do homework, make a noise, do a favor, etc. It also covers some cases where make and do can be used with different meanings or implications, such as with causative verbs, passive voice, questions, etc.


The Verb Have




This chapter explains the use of the verb have in English. It covers how to use have as a main verb or an auxiliary verb, how to use have to express possession, relationship, experience, obligation, etc. It also covers some common collocations and expressions with have, such as have a shower, have a good time, have a headache, have to go, etc. It also covers some cases where have can be used with different meanings or forms, such as with perfect tenses, modal verbs, negative verbs, etc.


Shall and Will




This chapter explains the difference between shall and will in English. It covers how to use shall and will to express future time, intention, prediction, etc. It also covers how to use shall and will with different persons and subjects. It also covers some cases where shall and will can be used to express different meanings or attitudes, such as with requests, offers, suggestions, promises, etc.


Used to (Verb) and to be used to




This chapter explains the difference between used to (verb) and to be used to in English. It covers how to use used to (verb) to express past habits or states that are no longer true in the present. It also covers how to use to be used to to express familiarity or adaptation to something in the present or the past. It also covers some cases where used to (verb) and to be used to can be used with different forms or implications, such as with questions, negatives, modal verbs, gerunds, So that and so as




This chapter explains the difference between so that and so as in English. It covers how to use so that and so as to express purpose or result of an action or a state. It also covers how to use so that and so as with different tenses and modal verbs. It also cover


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